Flash, fragments

Rider of the lost art

It wasn’t until nine that day that they understood what had been going on. The people at the party seemed to be entertaining themselves enough for Maria to leave for a while. They were laughing and dancing and jumping all around, and for a fleeting moment she feared the whole floor would crumble and they would all fall down and die. Nothing of the sort happened, but a bunch of people were still missing. Or rather, they had failed to show up. Maria was known for throwing the biggest and baddest parties in town, she shouldn’t feel insulted by his absence, but somehow, she did. They’d met in a bar a few weeks ago, quite randomly. He had this weird look on his face, the puppy dog eyes she called it days after they had begun chatting. He wore sideburns and that gave him a seventies look she rather enjoyed. He looked like a huge teddy bear, she liked that too. He wasn’t much of a talker, but for some mysterious reason, she enjoyed his company. And when she had invited him, his shy smile seemed to mean yes, I will come and kiss you under some carefully placed mistletoe. But it was nine, and he was still missing. Continue reading

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Flash

If you see her, say hello

He yawned and got to the kitchen to get some coffee. Everyone still slept in the house, just as usual. The dishes were still there, dirty knives and forks here and there as if some tiny world war had been going on without his knowing. He grabbed a cup, poured himself some coffee and threw it all in the microwave. Bad habits. But his life was all about those. He yawned again and this time his jaw made an awfully frightening noise. He was getting old. There was no sense in denying it. That’s when it took him – the anxiety. The thought. Nothing came to him in a monstruous wave and hit him right away. Nothing. He had achieved nothing he had planned, had lived half the life he’d dreamed, had said half the things he’d felt. Jeffrey took the cup to the living room and almost dived into the sofa. He heard a noise coming from the door and immediately thought the cat had found out a spider. It usually plays with them, drags them everywhere, and inadvertently kills them while doing so. Jeffrey often joked life did the same to you. But the cat had nothing to do with the noise. A piece of paper had been slided under the door and Jeffrey stared at it, his heart pounding in his chest. Continue reading

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Flash

Rusty

It had been a dead end.
I quickly came to realize there was nothing more I could do. I had to wait. Back in the day, you didn’t have any app to tell you where to go, where to find the next person. There was no swiping right or left movement, nothing of the sort. You had to wait. You had to wait for the green light, you had to wait for the rain to show up, you had to wait in line. Nowadays, people just don’t bother. You don’t see lines in the street anymore, you see riots, mishapen circles, geometrical atrocities, spatial representations of even more atrocious people really. Continue reading

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Flash, prose

Memories

After a while, people started to get used to everything that was happening. The terrible things, I mean. The wrong people were being elected almost everywhere, it seemed as if peace was turning into another simple five letter word which nobody really paid attention to. Cars were stolen and thrown onto men, women, husbands, wives and children; all of that, for no other justification than complete and utter misunderstandings. That, Kid, that took a hell of a lot out of me, and out of a lot of people. Our lives quickly changed – simplified by that ridiculous and yet harsh truth : you knew things would turn out to shite, you just did not know when. All in all, with hindsight, I would now say that it was more waiting than really living at all, you know? Continue reading

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